• Rickt: I am the biggest Cal Jr fan around but one of my good friends played minor l...

Staying in Beantown.

Word has just come down that Curt Schilling (and family) will be staying in Boston. No sooner had the news leaked out than I saw that the man known as Big Schill will be slightly smaller next year, or (literally) pay the price:

ORLANDO – Curt Schilling’s new 1-year, $8 million deal with the Red Sox (which is pending results of a physical) will include $2 million worth of incentives if he meets weight requirements. The team hopes to insure that Schilling will be fit when he comes to spring training, a source close to the negotiations said moments ago.

But just as I was wondering “How in the heck did they ever get Curt to agree to that?!” I learned that the Weight Watchers plan was the hurler’s own idea:

I inserted the weigh in clause in the 2nd round of offers, counter offers. Given the mistakes I made last winter and into Spring Training I needed to show them I recognized that, and understood the importance of it. Being overweight and out of shape are two different things. I also was completely broad sided by the fact that your body doesn’t act/react the same way as you get older. Even after being told that for the first 39 years of my life. Now I can’t get on Dougie anymore, which sucks, and I am sure the clause will add 15-100 more jokes to Tito’s Schilling joke book.

Other performance incentives include $3 million based on innings pitched and another $1 million if he gets a Cy Young vote (any vote). So while the AP reported a total of $5 million in potential bonuses, it actually adds up to $6 million, even if that final million is rather unlikely. In short, unless he misses serious time or gets seriously husky, Curt will make the same as he did last year and finish his career in Boston. The other teams who called, according to Schilling’s blog, included Philly, St. Louis, Houston, and Arizona.

For a list of reasons why I’m psyched about this, click here.

8 Responses to “Curt Schilling: Staying in Boston. And staying fit.”

  1. So his follow up sentence means nothing?

    “I’m an American League fan, and I go with the American League team, maybe with the exception of the Mets,” he said. “Maybe that would be the one time I wouldn’t because I’m loyal to New York.”

    Cmon, this is like picking the team in a Super Bowl you have nothing invested in. It’s more fun to watch if you have a side to root for.

    Though I’d probably still root against the Yankees.

  2. Rich, please. If you’re a Yankees fan and the Red Sox are in the World Series, you don’t root FOR anyone. You simply root AGAINST the Red Sox. Whether they get beaten by the NL team or by act of God makes no difference, as long as they are humiliated.

  3. BTW, I’m loving that right now the Google advertisement located at the bottom of this post is for Fred Thompson 2008.

  4. Sarah Green says:

    As a citizen of Boston, I reject Mr. Giuliani’s pandering. I’m not fooled, Rudy! Now you just lose points for being two-faced or, even worse, a dread FLIP-FLOPPER. Did you vote for the Red Sox before you voted against them??

  5. See, Coley. That’s been my experience with Red Sox fans, but Yankee fans have usually expressed agressive indifference towards the Sox and their fans. I don’t recall hearing about “Varitek is a little bitch” or “Lugo sucks, Drew swallows” tshirts. Actually, I think that last one might have been for sale on Yawkey Way until recently.

    Besides, if loyalty to a certain sports team is honestly affecting anyone’s vote for the PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, they need to reexamine their politics.

  6. Nick Kapur says:

    I dunno, Rich.

    I kind of like my presidents to not be Evil.

  7. Nick Kapur says:

    I can’t help wondering if the weight clause maybe isn’t little more than a face saving measure. If we recall, Schilling said in spring training last year that he would only play for $13 million this coming season. And lo and behold, adding the weight clause brings the total to exactly 13 million (along with the easily reachable incentives). Without knowing the actual weight targets set, it’s immossible to say for sure, but I wonder how realistic those targets actually are, or if Schilling actually even intends to try to meet them.

  8. Right, Nick. Because, it would have been embarrassing to sign a contract for less than $13 million, but not at all embarrassing to forfeit $4 million due to fatness.

Leave a Reply

    Recent Comments

    • Rickt: I am the biggest Cal Jr fan around but one of my good friends played minor league baseball in the Orioles...
    • HADAJUN: I wish for play in Japan. The death is regrettable.
    • David the okajima: was wondering if I related too this guy?
    • HaroldHecuba: Mike Mussina is EASTERN EUROPEAN, not Italian.
    • handsomerandyblackladdiebrad1953: Plus,Jackson’s Polo Grounds-heightened batting stats,when park-adjusted,make...

Marketplace

    Subscribe via email

    Enter your email address:

    Archives

What's Popular

Featured posts

220px-Bbwaa_logo_web

December 5, 2011

Will anybody get elected to the Hall of Fame this year?

Last week, we asked you to vote for who you would like to see enshrined in baseball’s Hall of Fame. The verdict? If it were up to UmpBump readers, nobody would make it in. The leading vote getter (so far) is Jeff Bagwell, who has 60% support. Of course, in the real voting, players need […]

January 5, 2011

Annual UmpBump Hall of Fame Balloting: 2011 Edition

In what has become an annual tradition, we here at UmpBump cast our ballots for the Hall of Fame on the eve of the announcements of the voting for the real Hall of Fame. Voters can vote for anyone ever who has been retired from baseball for at least five years and is not already […]

According to the internet, "The Little Napoleon" John McGraw was the greatest manager of all time.

October 19, 2010

Crowdsourcing the Greats: The Top 10 Managers of All Time

Now that we’ve looked at every position on the diamond, as well as relief pitchers, we are nearing the end of our “Crowdsourcing the Greats” series. But before we finish, let’s turn one more time to the internet hoi polloi for answers on who the greatest baseball manager of all time was. As usual, we […]