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You gotta feel for the guy.

edmonds1.jpgToday, it was announced that the San Diego Padres released center fielder Jim Edmonds. The team had stumbled out of the gate in 2008 to a thus-far-disappointing 12-23 record and felt that they needed to make a change.

Prior to the season, we had speculated that Edmonds would be a “boom-or-bust” addition to the Pads, and clearly, the organization already labeled him the latter. Edmonds was batting an abysmal .178/.265/.233 line prior to today. Admittedly, I am yet to see a San Diego game this year, but the article (linked above) mentions how it wasn’t just poor offense that did him in:

While Edmonds once made spectacular catches while with the Cardinals and Angels, he clearly lost a step or two and simply couldn’t catch up to fly balls.

Again, not having seen Edmonds play, it’s difficult for me to comment much on this, except to say that I’m sure his decline on defense is made far more visible by the very spacious outfield at Petco Park.

For those of you now wondering if your team should sign Jim, there are things to note:

edmonds3.jpgPRO: Edmonds has a .227 BABiP this year, which is well below his career norm (more in the .300 area). So there’s room for improvement.

CON: His BABiP has been decreasing annually since 2004, so it might not be much of a fluke.

PRO: His line-drive rate is as good, if not better than, his prime, so when he makes contact, it’s been solid a good portion of the time.

CON: He’s also making contact on fewer occasions. His strikeout rate is at 23.3%, which is higher than his career norm. And he always was very strike-out prone to begin with. Combine this with a BABiP trending down, and it’s a big warning sign.

PRO: But he’s back to seeing 4.2 pitchers per plate appearance! The old, more patient Jim is back!

CON: Despite this, he’s still not walking as often as he used to. Besides, when you’re batting .178, it doesn’t matter much anyway. You’re still an offensive liability.

PRO: But the glove! THE GLOVE! In a smaller outfield, he can still be a good defensive player, right?

CON: Probably not. At least not in center field. Even last year, playing in Busch Stadium which has much less space in center towards the corners, it was becoming clear that those Gold Gloves were a thing of the past.

So is this it for Jim? Knowing what I mentioned above, would you still take a chance on him?

edmonds2.jpeg

No Responses to “Padres Release Jim Edmonds”

  1. I sprung for the MLB.TV premium package this year at $120, after having the standard package last year and loved it. I can watch the games while on the road on my laptop. I wanted premium this year so I could hook the laptop up to the big screen while at home too. Well, it sucks so far! The site was completely down until 10:10pm on Monday night. What an agonizing wait! I had to resort to ESPN Gamecast, which although anticlimatic, still fulfills my desire for the play-by-play. The MLB.TV 1.2 mega resolution version is a still-frame, sputtering mess. After an hour on hold on the help line they tell me they’re having some unnamed “problems” and hope to have them resolved soon. Well I hope so too. What a disappointing start to a much anticipated baseball watching season. Go Cards, I hope to see you in hi-res soon!

  2. Woah woah woah. Do you have a source for the FOX blackout thing other than the press release? That’s pretty huge news if you do… but otherwise I’m pretty sure that isn’t true. The press releases just don’t usually mention blackout rules and the MLB.tv website still says:

    • National Live Blackout (Regular Season): Due to Major League Baseball national exclusivities, each Saturday until 7:00 PM EST (beginning May 17, 2008 and continuing for remaining Saturdays during the regular season) and each Sunday night (for games that begin after 5:00 PM EST), all scheduled webcasts of games played within such time period will be blacked out.

  3. Malicious Sophist says:

    Don’t forget the premium service also gives us MLB.tv Mosaic — the ability to watch as many as 6 games simultaneously (with alerts when your favorite players/ fantasy players come up to bat or pitch). This is my first year of premium service, third year with MLB.tv, and this year’s product has simply blown me away. Up to this point I have not had one problem (*knocks wood*).

    Re: watching 1.2MB service on your big screen. If I watch the full screen feed on my 21-inch monitor it starts to get a little grainy. I don’t think it would look too great on a large screen tv – but hopefully I’m wrong.

  4. Alejandro Leal says:

    Drats! I knew it was too good to be true. I was comfortably watching my White Sox on mlb.tv while the local Fox broadcast had the Braves-Mets going.

    But it’s pretty clear, national black out for Saturday games kicks in on May 17. Arg.

  5. crow nest says:

    I’m surprised more folks aren’t complaining about the elimination of Condensed Games on mlb.com. It seems to me that if more people knew how great that was, and mlb had kept it, mlb would be making even more bucks. Since they’ve eliminated that and any decent extended highlights, their product is actually worse than it was 3 years ago.

  6. In general, I’ve found Silverlight to be a horrendous downgrade from the regular Windows Media player — the feed is grainy and blurry when compared to to regular Windows Media. Plus, the regular Windows Media feed allows you, whether with a Firefox plugin or by copying/pasting the link, to watch games in the standalone player, which you can resize however you like — Silverlight has only 3 possible pre-set sizes, including the aforementioned not-exactly-full-screen. Finally, Media Player is much, much easier to navigate precisely via rewind and fast-forward. I’ve uninstalled Silverlight so I can use Media Player (because once you install Silverlight MLBTV doesn’t give you a choice), and judging by comments I’ve seen on message boards, I’m not alone in that decision. It’s very possible that Silverlight will be better than Media Player in the long run, but it’s pretty clear that the technology is not ready for prime time, and for 90 bucks, MLB shouldn’t be rolling it out (and billing it as an upgrade) until it is.

    In general, I’m a huge fan of MLBTV, and MLB is leaps and bounds ahead of the other sports leagues in terms of what it offers via streaming media, but it seems as if they’ve consistently given short shrift to quality and customer service. Hopefully that will change.

  7. Count me out this year if condensed games don’t come back. That was, for me and many who live overseas, the best feature of mlb.tv. Isn’t mlb trying to increase its appeal to the international market?

  8. Alejandro Leal says:

    You know what else? I just noticed that you can’t click on the inning of an archived game to watch just the action that took place in said inning. Last year, once a game had been made available as an archived game, you used to be able to click on an inning from the line score to watch the action.

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