• vontreba maddux: I saw a fantastic catch by a female fielder. It was on Facebook. She ran up ...

Now most of the big name free agents have been snapped up, the common denominator among most of those left on the market is the draft pick compensation hanging around their neck. The likes of Kyle Lohse, Rafael Soriano and Michael Bourn remained unsigned and all are clearly candidates to improve a significant number of teams.

It’s understandable that teams would be reticent to both hand over a big free agent deal as well as give up what could be a pretty valuable draft pick. All three of the above names are represented by Scott Boras who has a reputation for holding back in the free agent market to ensure that he has the only first baseman/shortstop/closer (delete as applicable) left on the market, leaving teams to scramble for the last available option. Boras didn’t get where is without knowing how to work the market to his client’s benefit but he does have a couple of miscalculations on his record and it’s possible that his strategy doesn’t work so well under the new CBA rules.

Lohse has been particularly vocal, yet realistic, about the current situation when he argued that “a guy like a Zack Greinke or Anibal Sanchez got a get-out-of-jail-free card because they got traded midseason, so the rules don’t pertain to them. I’m obviously a little biased, but the rules could use some tweaking.”

The current rules do create the possibility that, come the summer, players that are in with a chance of receiving a qualifying offer as a free agent next off-season, may begin agitating for a trade if they think it will ultimately help their free agent chances. Obviously this won’t apply to every player, someone like Jacoby Ellsbury could quite easily be young enough, healthy enough and good enough for a team to have few concerns over giving up a draft pick to sign him. There’s also the possibility of the Red Sox being in contention for a playoff birth and the player being unlikely to move as a result.

However, to take an example such as prospective 2014 free agent Chase Utley for who a strong bounceback year could result in the Phillies making him a qualifying offer, there could be motivation to want to be traded mid-season to help his free agent case. As he’ll be 35 years old when his next contract kicks in, Utley is the sort of player teams will be reluctant to give up a draft pick for and could find his market reduced as a result. Utley doesn’t have a reputation as someone who publicly kicks up a fuss, but if the Phillies aren’t contending he could find himself in a position where a mid-summer trade will be of significant financial benefit to him.

By setting up a system where players can benefit so significantly from being traded during the year, MLB has left itself open to players demanding trades to circumvent the new rules. It might not be Utley that gets the ball rolling, but it wouldn’t be surprising to see someone trying to game the system before long.

Tagged:

Leave a Reply

    Recent Comments

    • vontreba maddux: I saw a fantastic catch by a female fielder. It was on Facebook. She ran up a corner putting a foot...
    • Marmadook: Dead.
    • Smithd553: Very nice! kdfbdddkdb
    • Latest sports news India: For Brazilians, not winning the World Cup would be bad enough. Even worse would be bitter...
    • Andy: Awesome list and very useful.

Marketplace

    Subscribe via email

    Enter your email address:

    Archives

Featured posts

220px-Bbwaa_logo_web

December 5, 2011

Will anybody get elected to the Hall of Fame this year?

Last week, we asked you to vote for who you would like to see enshrined in baseball’s Hall of Fame. The verdict? If it were up to UmpBump readers, nobody would make it in. The leading vote getter (so far) is Jeff Bagwell, who has 60% support. Of course, in the real voting, players need […]

January 5, 2011

Annual UmpBump Hall of Fame Balloting: 2011 Edition

In what has become an annual tradition, we here at UmpBump cast our ballots for the Hall of Fame on the eve of the announcements of the voting for the real Hall of Fame. Voters can vote for anyone ever who has been retired from baseball for at least five years and is not already […]

According to the internet, "The Little Napoleon" John McGraw was the greatest manager of all time.

October 19, 2010

Crowdsourcing the Greats: The Top 10 Managers of All Time

Now that we’ve looked at every position on the diamond, as well as relief pitchers, we are nearing the end of our “Crowdsourcing the Greats” series. But before we finish, let’s turn one more time to the internet hoi polloi for answers on who the greatest baseball manager of all time was. As usual, we […]